The Lake County Montana Directory
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The Lake County Montana Directory  



The Lake County Montana Directory  



Communities in Lake County Montana

Arlee 4th of July Celebration

All are welcome to attend this cultural celebration, hosted by the Flathead Nation and attended by Native Americans from throughout the US and Canada. Events include traditional drumming and singing, competition dancing, parade, arts and crafts, and food vendors. Participants may camp on-site in teepees, tents, campers and RV's. Most facilities are handicapped accessible. Free admission. Drugs and alcohol are strictly prohibited (vehicles and persons subject to search).

Arlee 4th of July Celebration grounds are east of Highway 93 at the south end of Arlee. Turn east off Highway 93 on to Pow-Wow Road and go east 0.5 mile.

And don't forget about the Pow Wow Tours, Native Adventures, and camping. Call the People's Center 406-675-0160 or e-mail tours@peoplescenter.org for more information.

Please call to verify dates and times as dates are tentative and could change.

Provided by: Montana's Official State Travel Site

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Arlee Demographics

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 602 people, 235 households, and 161 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 92.8 people per square mile (35.9/km≤). There were 268 housing units at an average density of 41.3 per square mile (16.0/km≤). The racial makeup of the CDP was 45.85% White, 50.00% Native American, 0.66% from other races, and 3.49% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.15% of the population.

There were 235 households out of which 37.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.1% were married couples living together, 20.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.1% were non-families. 26.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.14.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 32.4% under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 28.2% from 25 to 44, 23.4% from 45 to 64, and 8.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 104.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.1 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $21,188, and the median income for a family was $22,125. Males had a median income of $25,500 versus $19,167 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $11,558. About 37.6% of families and 34.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 51.2% of those under age 18 and 21.1% of those age 65 or over.

Provided by Wikipedia

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Big Arm Montana

Big Arm is located twelve miles north of Polson on the "big arm" of Flathead Lake. Big Arm State Park is the largest park on Flathead Lake and is less than five miles north of Big Arm on Highway 93. At twenty-eight miles long and 15 miles wide, Flathead Lake is the largest natural freshwater lake in the western United States. Flathead Lake's Big Arm Bay is a popular jump-off point to Wild Horse Island State Park. The Salish-Kootenai Indians once pastured their horses on Wild Horse Island to keep them from being stolen by other tribes. Enjoy swimming, fishing, sailing and boating on the beautiful Flathead Lake!

Provided by: Montana's Official State Travel Site

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Big Arm Montana

The Big Arm Unit is on the southwest part of the lake, on Big Arm Bay. Boat rentals and cruises are available to take tourists to Wildhorse Island. Big Arm Bay has a long pebble beach, where Canadian geese may be seen. It is also nice to sit on the shore and gaze at the boats quietly sailing by. The site has campgrounds, a marina, picnic, and swimming areas. Fishing is good at Big Arm; anglers catch perch, trout, and whitefish. Flathead Lake has a variety of fish species but is best known for its trout. The main species in the lake are bull trout, cutthroat trout, and lake trout. Fishing in Flathead Lake is best from a boat; rentals are available at various locations.

The lower Flathead River exits the lake at Polson and eventually flows into the Clark Fork River of the Columbia. Many people fish the Flathead rivers with fly fishing rods. You might see them casting back and forth, while they stand in the river. They wear hip boots to do this kind of fishing because the water is very cold. Anyone fishing on the Flathead Indian Reservation, needs to buy a tribal day use permit and a tribal fishing permit.
 

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Big Arm State Park:

28031 Big Arm State Park Rd. Big Arm Montana 59910
Telephone: 406-751-4577

Big Arm State Park is located 14 miles north of Polson on U.S. Highway 93. The Park is a popular launch point to access Wild Horse Island. The Park contains 40 campsites along the Flathead Lake shoreline. There are 3 yurts, showers and flush toilets. Swimming, boating, fishing and hiking on the nature trail are fun activities that can be enjoyed without leaving the park.

Services & Amenities include Boat Ramp, Day Use Group Shelter, Dock, Hiking Trail, Picnic Area with Shelter, Picnicking, Retail, Firewood, Retail, Ice, Toilet, Pit/Vault, Wildlife Viewing, Swimming, and Flathead Lake. Check-in time is 2:00pm for campsites and 3:00pm for tipiís, yurts and cabins. Check-out time is 1:00pm for campsites and 12:00pm for tipiís, yurts and cabins. Late checkouts may incur additional fees unless prior arrangements have been made.
 

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Charlo Demographics

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 439 people, 166 households, and 112 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 219.4 people per square mile (84.7/km≤). There were 175 housing units at an average density of 87.5 per square mile (33.8/km≤). The racial makeup of the CDP was 76.77% White, 1.14% African American, 17.77% Native American, 2.05% from other races, and 2.28% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.73% of the population.

There were 166 households out of which 42.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.6% were married couples living together, 15.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.5% were non-families. 26.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.22.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 36.0% under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 26.4% from 25 to 44, 18.2% from 45 to 64, and 12.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 96.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.9 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $24,167, and the median income for a family was $32,500. Males had a median income of $25,577 versus $17,250 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $10,687. About 16.0% of families and 21.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.9% of those under age 18 and 8.1% of those age 65 or over.

Provided by Wikipedia

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Charlo Montana

Charlo was originally a trail crossing for freighters hauling grain and other goods from the rich Ronan Valley to the railroad at Dixon. The place was first called Big Flat, then Charlotte, and later Charlo, in honor of Chief Charlo of the Flatheads, one of the few chiefs who refused to sign Special Commissioner James A. Garfield's order (August 27, 1872) removing all Indians of the region to the Jocko reservation. Joseph Dixon, a governor and US Senator, was instrumental in establishing the name Charlo. (from Cheney's Names on the Face of Montana, Mountain Press Publishing Company)

The Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana is located in Charlo. It was established to discover and memorialize the history and culture of the Flathead Indian Reservation and early Montana. Long-term exhibits include weaponry, spurs and saddlery, a vast collection of Native American beadwork, life-size dioramas of wild animals and of an Indian camp. An old cabin, and wagons and buggies dot the museum grounds.

The National Bison Range is located just seven miles southwest of Charlo on Highway 212. It was established in 1908 and is one of the oldest wildlife refuges in the nation. The range protects one of the most important remaining herds of American bison. About 300 to 500 of these great shaggy animals roam nearly 19,000 acres of grassland and timber. The range is also home to whitetail and mule deer, elk, bighorn sheep, pronghorns, and at least 200 species of birds. A visitorís center, auto tour, and picnic area are available.

Provided by: Montana's Official State Travel Site

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Elmo Montana

Elmo is on the Big Arm of Flathead Lake in western Montana. Flathead is the largest natural freshwater lake in the western United States. Twenty-eight miles long and 15 miles wide, Flathead Lake is renowned for its fishing. Wild Horse Island State Park, a 2,163-acre wilderness area on the west shore of the lake, is home to bald eagles, bighorn sheep, and wild horses.

Flathead Valley is also known for its orchards, which produce famous Flathead cherries, apples, plums, apricots and pears. The Flathead area is one of the top cherry-growing regions in the country. Each season, thousands of people flock to the orchards along Flathead Lake to pick cherries or buy them from roadside stands, and the harvest provides a unique experience for visitors. Several thousand tons of cherries are harvested annually, contributing millions to the area's economy. Many of the orchards are family businesses that have been in operation for multiple generations.

The Flathead Indian Reservation is home to the Confederated Salish and Kootenai tribes. The tribes are a combination of the Salish, the Pend d'Oreille and the Kootenai. On the Flathead Indian Reservation, Elmo is also the site of the Standing Arrow Pow Wow during the third weekend of July. This is an Indian social gathering featuring drumming, dancing, and traditional dress and food. Nearby is Chief Cliff, a spiritual site to reservation Indians. Some say an Indian maiden can be seen standing on this cliff.

Provided by: Montana's Official State Travel Site

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Garden of the Rockies Museum

The Garden of the Rockies Museum was the first church in Ronan built in the early 1900s. It was given to the Mission Valley Heritage Association in 1980 and moved to its present site with a beautiful view of our famous Sheep's Head Mountain. We acquired Sloans Flat Stage Stop-a dovetailed log house built in 1886; which has added more history to our little corner of the Mission Valley. The Museum has been developed and operated by many volunteers.

Recent additions include a one room schoolhouse, a tool shed and farm machinery building. New buildings and ground space currently in the process of being acquired. We are in the process of developing a cultural center building, the former Round Butte gym building.

We extend an invitation to any individual or organization to join us in our effort to keep all remembering the way it was.

Provided by: Montana's Official State Travel Site

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Pablo Demographics

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 1,814 people, 622 households, and 475 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 372.5 people per square mile (143.8/km≤). There were 674 housing units at an average density of 138.4 per square mile (53.4/km≤). The racial makeup of the CDP was 43.44% White, 0.17% African American, 51.16% Native American, 0.11% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.72% from other races, and 4.36% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.31% of the population.

There were 622 households out of which 47.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.2% were married couples living together, 22.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.5% were non-families. 20.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.89 and the average family size was 3.27.

In the CDP the population was spread out with 38.5% under the age of 18, 9.9% from 18 to 24, 27.9% from 25 to 44, 17.0% from 45 to 64, and 6.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 26 years. For every 100 females there were 90.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.8 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $26,771, and the median income for a family was $28,615. Males had a median income of $20,982 versus $19,907 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $14,672. About 22.7% of families and 28.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 30.2% of those under age 18 and 9.2% of those age 65 or over.

Provided by Wikipedia

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Pablo Montana

Pablo was named for Michel Pablo, a Flathead Chief, rancher and stockman who, by raising bison, is one of the individuals responsible for saving the bison from extinction. Walking Coyote, a Pen d'Oreille Indian hunting in the Milk River country, brought a few bison calves back to the Flathead Valley and sold them to Pablo and Charles Allard. They were the nucleus of the herd that now roams the National Bison Range. (from Cheney's Names on the Face of Montana, Mountain Press Publishing Company)

Pablo is the headquarters for the Flathead Indian Reservation and lies at the base of the Mission Mountains south of Flathead Lake. Government offices for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes moved to Pablo in the late 1970s because of its central location on the Flathead Reservation. The Salish-Kootenai College was established in 1977. It has a library that holds an extensive collection of history books about the Native American Tribes.

Of special interest are the Ninepipe and Pablo Wildlife Refuges, Arlee Powwow in early July and Standing Arrow Pow Wow in Elmo in mid-July, as well as the Sqelix'u/Aqtsmaknik Cultural Center, which takes its name from the Salish-Kootenai languages meaning "the People's." Reflecting the people's desire to establish a center aimed at promoting, preserving and enhancing Salish-Kootenai culture, The People's Center was officially established in the fall of 1990. The facility lies north of Pablo on Highway 93 and includes exhibits, collections of Salish-Kootenai and Pend d'Oreille people, a learning center and gift shop. Educational day programs are available. The center tells the native story and shows the way of life as it has passed from generation to generation.

Provided by: Montana's Official State Travel Site

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Polson Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival

Cherry time in Montana's Flathead Lake Valley is one of the most exciting times of the year and Polson is where the cherry action is. Last year Polson's Annual Cherry Festival was a great success and this year's festival is sure to be even bigger, better and more exciting. Family Fun Event. The Festival is sponsored by the Polson Business Community with assistance from community organizations and businesses like the Flathead Lake Cherry Growers Association. With Cherry related foods, displays of Montana made items for sale and games for kids (or adults who think they are kids), your family will have a most memorable time. Come spend the entire day in Polson.

Quilt and Pillowcase Contest: Show your quilting skills. Enter your quilt or your pillowcase in this year's quilting contest. All entries will be displayed in different Polson businesses for all the community to see. Prizes will be awarded to the winners.

Cherry Pie Eating Contest: Like Cherry Pie? Do you think you can eat more cherry pie at one sitting than anyone else? Come compete and show us your appetite.

Cherry Pit Spitting/Stem Tying Contest: Your only time to spit on the streets of Polson without penalty. Let everyone see how far you can spit a cherry pit. Just show up to enter. Contest Time is 1:00pm Sunday.

Show your finger dexterity and ability to tie cherry stems. If you sew, tie flies, play piano, or have good 'fine motor' skills, you just might be the winner of this fun event! Just show up to enter. Contest Time is 2:00pm Sunday.

Exhibits and Montana Made Items: Come see, eat, purchase or sell an amazing assortment of everything from art, photos, crafts to foods and treats. If you would like to rent an exhibit space to sell your creations call Jackie Cripe at 883-5800 for details about booth size, cost, location, set up and dismantle times.

Provided by: Montana's Official State Travel Site

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Polson Montana

Incorporated April 5, 1910, Polson has a history of lumbering, ranching and steamboats. The city was named after pioneer rancher David Polson. Steamboats played a major part in early transportation of freight and passengers. The tugboat "Paul Bunyan" was instrumental in early logging operations.

Polson is located on the Flathead Indian Reservation in a natural amphitheater at the south end of Flathead Lake. This charming lakeside community is the trading center for one of Montana's most fertile farming areas. In a prime cherry growing region and home to numerous cherry orchards, Polson celebrates with an annual Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival.

The broad, sweeping Mission Valley south of Polson is bordered by the rugged, snow-capped Mission Mountains. The Flathead River that flows from Polson features whitewater rafting and Kerr Dam. The National Bison Range at Moiese with its large herds of bison, elk, deer, antelope and bairn sheep is nearby, as well as the Ninepipes and Pablo Wildlife Refuges for bird watchers.

Two museums, The Miracle of America and Polson-Flathead Historical Museum, offer many displays and memorabilia. Polson also has several city parks located on the lake and is home to the Polson Bay Golf Course, a magnificent golf course which is nestled near the Mission Mountains and at the base of Flathead Lake.

Provided by: Montana's Official State Travel Site

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Polson Montana on Flathead Lake

City of Polson: City Hall
http://www.cityofpolson.com 
Telephone: 406-883-8202
Address: 106 First Street East Polson, Montana 59860

The Lake County Courthouse
http://www.lakecounty-mt.org 
106 4th Ave East Polson, Montana 59860

Polson was incorporated in 1910 and is the county seat for Lake County. Polson lies in a natural amphitheater at the south end of Flathead Lake in Northwest Montana. Polson is located on the Flathead Indian Reservation. Polson is a lakeshore community in the trading center for one of most fertile farming areas in Montana. This prime cherry growing region is home to dozens of orchards, which Polson celebrates with an annual Cherry Festival.

The broad, sweeping Mission Valley south of Polson is bordered by the rugged, snow-capped Mission Mountains. The Flathead River that flows through Polson features whitewater rafting and Kerr Dam.

Polson becomes a popular attraction in the summertime, when temperatures range from 80 to 95 degrees. In July, Polson plays host to the Flathead Lake Basketball Tournament. The largest Car Show in the Pacific
 

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Ronan Area Chamber of Commerce

Ronan's Mission Mountain County Visitor's Center is a community project of the community of Ronan whose aim is to serve summer visitors to the Mission Valley in Western Montana. The community operates the visitor's center from Memorial Day through Labor Day of each summer tourism season. The visitor's center building is a hand-hewn log structure that was built in the 1870's and was used at the Sloan Stage Stop on the Dixon to Polson stagecoach line in the latter quarter of the 19th century. The building had fallen into disrepair and was relocated on property that was developed into the Mission Mountain Country Club in the 1980's. T

he cabin was moved off the site by Ronan State Bank and was eventually donated to the community for the purposes of being restored into a visitors information center. The project was spearheaded by the Lake County Community Development Corporation which raised community support for the project and secured the assistance of the US Forest Service who awarded a grant to further the project. The site is provided by Ronan State Bank and the building and improvements are owned by the Lake County Community Development Corporation. The center is operated by volunteers organized by the Ronan Chamber of Commerce. Plans are currently being developed to further improve the center by adding a hand hewn log structure to the site to house a restroom facility.

Although the Visitor Information Center is open seasonally, the Chamber of Commerce is open year round.

Provided by: Montana's Official State Travel Site

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Ronan Montana

Originally settled by Salish residents in 1883, this town was called Spring Creek for the local warm springs that flow into the nearby Flathead River. Residents changed the name to Ronan Springs in 1893 as a tribute to Maj. Peter Ronan, who served as the Flathead Indian Reservation agent from 1877 until his death in 1893. Ronan experienced a sudden boom when the federal government opened the Flathead Indian Reservation to non-Indian homesteading in 1910. (Copyright 2009, Montana Historical Society: Montana Place Names from Alzada to Zortman, Montana Historical Society Research Center Staff)

Adorned with the beauty of the Mission Mountain and various sources of fishing and wildlife habitat, the community of more than 3,000 residents offers a wealth of resources and enjoyment. Ronan's Area Chamber of Commerce is a community project serving summer visitors to the Mission Valley. Hiking in the Mission Mountain Wilderness Area by permit, touring the National Bison Range, picnicking in the city park, enjoying the Garden of the Rockies Museum and sightseeing along the Flathead River are among the many attractions. Just west of Ronan, The Mission Mountain Golf Course is acclaimed as one of Montana's finest golf courses featuring lush fairways and beautiful green with a fantastic view of the Mission Mountains. This course is suited for any caliber of golfer and is open to the public.

Ninepipe and Pablo National Wildlife Refuge is an exceptional wetland complex that contains over 800 glacial potholes and a 1,770-acre reservoir. About 200 bird species have been recorded. Nesting great blue herons and double-crested cormorants can be observed from the road on the west side of the refuge.

Provided by: Montana's Official State Travel Site

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Seeley Lake Demographics

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 1,436 people, 589 households, and 411 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 131.9 people per square mile (50.9/km≤). There were 938 housing units at an average density of 86.2 per square mile (33.3/km≤). The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.94% White, 0.07% African American, 1.46% Native American, 0.21% Asian, 0.49% from other races, and 0.84% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.46% of the population. There were 589 households out of which 29.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.4% were married couples living together, 5.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.1% were non-families. 24.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.89. In the CDP the population was spread out with 25.3% under the age of 18, 5.2% from 18 to 24, 28.3% from 25 to 44, 29.5% from 45 to 64, and 11.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 113.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 112.1 males. The median income for a household in the CDP was $35,101, and the median income for a family was $38,188. Males had a median income of $30,000 versus $18,269 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $18,825. About 7.0% of families and 10.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.4% of those under age 18 and 4.8% of those age 65 or over.

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Seeley Lake Montana

Seeley Lake is flanked by the peaks of the Mission and Swan mountain ranges and is situated along one of the most scenic drives in Montana. Beginning at the charming village of Bigfork on the north and ending at Clearwater Junction on the south, this 91-mile stretch of road is commonly known as the Seeley-Swan Highway. Montana Highway 83 provides a scenic route between Glacier and Yellowstone National Parks. Those who love water and the great outdoors will discover excellent camping, boating, fishing, and hiking opportunities at Placid Lake State Park and the Salmon Lake State Park.

Folks visiting Seeley Lake have many outdoor recreational opportunities from which to choose. During winter, a snowmobiler will discover more than 350 miles of groomed snowmobile trails in this area and guided snowmobile tours are available. Seeley Lake also boasts a world-class Nordic ski trail system.

During spring, summer and autumn, folks can enjoy birding, wildlife viewing, fishing, camping, boating, hiking, backpacking, horseback riding or mountain bike along hundreds of miles of trails and roads. You can also canoe the Clearwater River Canoe Trail. This easy 3.5-mile canoe route along the willow-lined river provides excellent opportunities to see many types of birds, including bald eagles.

Prior to settlement by European Americans, the Seeley Lake area was populated by Native American people, primarily Salish and occasionally Blackfeet. The beginning of European settlement in this area was by Jasper B. and Elmer Seely in 1881, who had a contract to furnish ties for the Northern Pacific Railroad. The modern day spelling of Seeley Lake was due to a misspelling of Mr. Seely's name.

Early homesteaders made their living from timber and fur. The first logging near Seeley Lake took place in 1892. In 1896 J.B. Seely was the first ranger at the Lewis and Clark Forest Reserve now the Seeley Lake District, part of Lolo National Forest. In 1896, the Forest Service offered the first timber sale at Seeley Lake. It was purchased by the Big Blackfoot Logging Company. World War II increased demand for lumber and another round of sawmill operations began. The demand for lumber continued after the war and so did the timber industry in Seeley Lake.

The Forest Service began to put the logging roads to broader use by encouraging recreational activity in the area. In 1915 the Forest Service started leasing lots around Seeley Lake that were acquired by families from Missoula and other cities around Montana. The MacLean family was one of these. Reverend MacLean raised two sons, one of whom, Norman, later wrote about family and fishing the Blackfoot River in his novel A River Runs Through It. By 1926 there were 35 summer cottages on Seeley Lake. The semi-remote location of the Seeley Lake area combined with the abundance of fish, game and large tracts of undeveloped wild country encouraged the development of Seeley Lake as a resort community.

Reminders of Seeley Lake's rich past are still evident in area homesteads, schoolhouses, camps, dude ranches, recreational facilities and logging operations. The historic and cultural resources of the Seeley Lake area contribute greatly to what makes this place special.

Provided by: Montana's Official State Travel Site

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St Ignatius Montana

St. Ignatius is a town in Lake County, Montana, United States. The population was 788 at the 2000 census. The town is located on the Flathead Indian Reservation.

Demographics

As of the census[2] of 2000, there were 788 people, 307 households, and 194 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,509.1 people per square mile (585.1/km≤). There were 328 housing units at an average density of 628.1 per square mile (243.5/km≤). The racial makeup of the town was 52.54% White, 44.67% Native American, 0.13% Asian, 0.13% Pacific Islander, 0.25% from other races, and 2.28% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.19% of the population.The population was 198 000 000 213

There were 307 households out of which 34.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.4% were married couples living together, 18.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.8% were non-families. 31.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.27.

In the town the population was spread out with 32.1% under the age of 18, 9.3% from 18 to 24, 24.6% from 25 to 44, 21.7% from 45 to 64, and 12.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 84.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 74.8 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $25,682, and the median income for a family was $34,250. Males had a median income of $30,804 versus $24,844 for females. The per capita income for the town was $12,336. About 15.5% of families and 19.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.2% of those under age 18 and 17.6% of those age 65 or over.

Information provided by wikiPedia 

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St. Ignatius Mission

The St. Ignatius Mission was built in the early 1890's. This Catholic Church is unique because its walls and ceilings have 58 original paintings by Brother Joseph Carignano on them. The Mission Mountain Range is a beautiful backdrop of scenery behind the Mission Church. The church is located on the Flathead Indian Reservation. We have two very special paintings of the Salish Lord and Lord's mother (in Native American form) that are located in the back of the Mission.

Next to the Mission, we have a museum and gift shop that displays Mission and Indian artifacts and sells religious items. We also have the log home which was the original Sisters' residence when they first arrived.

The Mission is open daily for tourists and for those who wish to worship privately from 9:00am - 7:00pm in the summer. 9:00am - 5:00pm in the winter. Sunday Mass is at 9:15am.

Provided by: Montana's Official State Travel Site

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Standing Arrow Pow Wow

This is an Indian social gathering featuring drumming, dancing, and traditional dress and food. Visitors are welcome and asked to respect the dance area, which is sacred.

Join us at one of the Indian country's most publicized events, Pow Wows. Learn the how's and why's of Pow Wow dancing. Know the difference between a grass dancer and a jungle dress dancer. Watch the veteran's honoring ceremony, tiny tots dancing, and enjoy 'Indian' humor.

Meander through vendor's wares from the heart of Indian country.

Come celebrate life with us. This is the Kootenai Tribe's celebration hosted by the Flathead Reservation, on the west shore of Flathead Lake.

Standing Arrow Pow Wow will be held in Elmo, which is 15 miles north of Polson and 35 miles south of Kalispell on Highway 93.

Provided by: Montana's Official State Travel Site

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The Polson Country Club

Experience 'Montana golf' the way you imagine it should be...yhe way it is at Polson Country Club. Open to the public since 1936, our twenty-seven breathtaking holes boast spectacular lake and mountain views that comprise the only golf course with fairways adjacent to the shores of the Flathead Lake.

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Wild Horse Island State Park on Flathead Lake:

c/o FWP Region 1 Headquarters
490 N Meridian Rd Kalispell Montana 59901
Telephone: 406-849-5256

Wild Horse Island is one of the larger islands on Flathead Lake. It is a primitive 2,200 acre State Park that is only accessible by boat. Wildlife on the island i osprey, bald eagles, deer, big horn sheep, and wild horses. The island is for day use only and maintains about 4 miles of trails.The perimeter of the island contains Private property. Please do not trespass on private property. One of the better public access points in on the north side of the island, Skeeko Bay. Itís in a cove, has a gravel beach and easy access to trailhead. This park resides within the boundaries of the Flathead Nation. Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe fishing license is required for fishing.

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The Polson Country Club

Experience 'Montana golf' the way you imagine it should be...yhe way it is at Polson Country Club. Open to the public since 1936, our twenty-seven breathtaking holes boast spectacular lake and mountain views that comprise the only golf course with fairways adjacent to the shores of the Flathead Lake.

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